60GHz Band: a Solution for Small Cell Backhaul?

60GHz-microwave-backhaul-could-be-effective-solution-for-small-cell-if-regulators-in-various-nations-permit-its-use-says-Aviat-Networks-07Oct13

Small cell will enable mobile usage in dense urban environments but will need a backhaul solution to make it possible. Photo credit: Ed Yourdon / Foter / CC BY-SA

The Case for Small Cell Backhaul
As the search for frequency bands with suitable capacity for small-cell backhaul continues, frequency bands above 50GHz start to appear attractive because they offer both high-bandwidth availability and short range owing to their inherent propagation characteristics. The white paper available at the bottom of this blog examines spectrum in the 57-64GHz range to see whether it can be of use for small cell backhaul.

In many countries, the frequency range 57-66GHz is split into a number of discrete bands with differing requirements and conditions of use and/or licensing. These differences will be highlighted where applicable.

From a global point of view, the use of this spectrum by Fixed Services (FS) is being addressed by the ITU-R in its draft report on Fixed Service use trends in WP5C, which is currently under development and states:

57 GHz to 64 GHz
The radio-frequency channel and block arrangements of these bands for FS are defined in Recommendation ITU-R F.1497.
In 2011, around 700 links were in use in this band in a few administrations. The majority of the links are used for fixed and mobile infrastructure.
The air absorption around 60 GHz is over 10 dB/km. This condition restricts the hop length; on the other hand, the spectrum reuse efficiency is high. This feature makes the band suitable for small cell mobile backhaul.

Clearly, a global reported usage of 700 links would suggest a great deal of underutilization, although with unlicensed use in many countries it is difficult to know whether these figures are accurate or not. Regardless, there are reasons as to why this could be the case, while noting that the ITU-R believes this band has potential for small cell backhaul.

One factor is that this spectrum is not allocated solely to the Fixed Service. In fact, in many countries the Fixed Services have no access to this spectrum at all. A more detailed country-by-country breakdown follows. Please sign up below to receive the entire white paper.

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Ian Marshall
Regulatory Manager
Aviat Networks

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Ireland Issues Spectrum Consultation on Wireless Communications

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The Irish communications regulator, ComReg, recently issued a consultation on its spectrum management strategy for 2011-2013. This was a wide-ranging consultation covering all aspects of spectrum management. However, in terms of interest to the microwave fixed point to point business were the following items:

A stated intention to open new bands for fixed point to point microwave wireless backhaul at 26GHz, 28GHz and 31GHz in line with the relevant ECC recommendations. In addition, ComReg requested comments on the following proposals regarding the use of Adaptive Modulation (ACM) and Cross Polarization (XPIC).

“Given the benefits identified from the use of Adaptive Coding & Modulation (ACM) in terrestrial Fixed Links, ComReg is proposing to make the deployment of ACM mandatory for all new fixed link applications across all fixed link frequency bands from 01 June 2012,” the consultation reads.

“With a view to encouraging spectrum efficiency in congested frequency bands, ComReg is proposing to make dual polarization mandatory for all new fixed link applications, where more than one link is required on the same path in the same frequency band, from 1 June 2012.”

The above two proposals demonstrate ComReg’s forward vision in embracing new wireless technology to increase the viability of using microwave solutions for critical traffic. Compared with some other regulators around the world, this is a welcome and refreshing approach.

Also ComReg indicated its intention to explore the possibility of using alternative licensing schemes, e.g. light licensing or link registration, in bands above 50GHz that are under consideration for opening in Ireland. Let me know your thoughts.

Ian Marshall
Regulatory Manager, Aviat Networks

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