Aviat Advanced Microwave Networking Seminar: DC Style

Microwave Networking seminar hosted by Aviat Networks in Washington D.C. Sept 2012

The Microwave Networking seminar hosted by Aviat Networks in Washington D.C. in Sept 2012 had a large turnout of attendees who listened to speakers present on wireless security, MPLS, Carrier Ethernet and other topics of interest to the backhaul community.

Aviat Networks recently completed the latest in its Technology Seminar series on microwave networking with a two-day event in the Crystal City area of Washington D.C. One observer noted attendees were particularly interested in hearing more about security of wireless backhaul systems and how to make a choice between using IP/MPLS or Carrier Ethernet.

The seminar was packed to capacity with more than 100 attendees from organizations that included various federal government agencies, utility companies, public safety organizations and mobile operators. These seminars focus solely on issues relevant to microwave deployments, related technology, regulatory issues, and deployment considerations—with no product pitches.

Attendees took advantage of an agenda that covered a wide variety of technology topics, including microwave-focused sessions on capacity, Ethernet QoS and OAM, IP/MPLS, security and strategies for lowering the total cost ownership of microwave networking. The highlight of the seminar was again Dick Laine, longtime Aviat Networks principal engineer, who spoke at length about Microwave Path Engineering and designing links using Adaptive Modulation. Dick is one of the foremost authorities in the U.S. on microwave planning and path design, and some attendees travel long distances just to hear him speak and share his experiences of more than 50 years in the microwave networking business. (If you’ve never heard/seen Dick present, register for his free Radio Head Technology Series).

Aviat Networks also welcomed special guest speakers from the NTIA, Comsearch, CommScope, Tellabs and LTI DataComm who graciously contributed their time and effort to provide a deeper understanding for attendees on their topics of expertise.

Keep a lookout for details of the next Technology Seminar that may be coming to a city near you! Or if you would like to be notified directly when our next microwave networking seminar is scheduled, please complete this form.

Stuart D. Little
Director, Product Marketing
Aviat Networks

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Diverse Wireless Network Topologies Cost Savings

To compare how different wireless backhaul network topologies perform under the same operating scenario, let’s analyze how a traditional hub-and-spoke and a ring configuration compare in connecting the same six sites (See table below). For the hub-and-spoke configuration, each cell site is provided 50 Mbps capacity in 1+1 protection. With five links and no path diversity, full protection is the only way to achieve five nines reliability. In this configuration, 10 antennas are employed, which average a large and costly 5.2 feet in diameter. Total cost of ownership for this six-site network is close to $700,000 for five years.

TCO Comparison by Topology

TCO Comparison by Topology

For a ring design for the same six sites, throughput of 200 Mbps is established to carry the traffic for each specific hop and any traffic coming in that direction from farther up the network. Designed to take advantage of higher-level redundancy schemes, the ring configuration only requires antennas that average 2.3 feet in diameter, which are much lower in cost compared to the antennas in the hub-and-spoke configuration. And even though the ring configuration requires 12 antennas and six links, its overall TCO amounts to a little under $500,000 over five years—30 percent less than TCO for the hub-and-spoke design for the same six sites.

This comparison is based upon deployments in the USA, where most operators lease tower space from other providers.

Gary Croke
Senior Product Marketing Manager
Aviat Networks

 

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