Antennas: Why Size is Important for This Wireless Equipment

Antenna tower supporting several antennas. The...

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In response to the recent FCC docket 10-153, many stakeholders proposed relaxing antennas requirements so as to allow the use of smaller antennas in certain circumstances. This is an increasingly important issue as tower rental costs can be as high as 62 percent of the total cost of ownership for a microwave solutions link. As these costs are directly related to antenna size, reducing antenna size leads to a significant reduction in the cost of ownership for microwave equipment links.

The Fixed Wireless Communications Coalition (FWCC), of which Aviat Networks is a major contributor, proposed a possible compromise that would leave Category A standards unchanged while relaxing Category B standards. The latter are less demanding than Category A, and after some further easing, might allow significantly smaller antennas. The rules should permit the use of these smaller antennas where congestion is not a problem, and require upgrades to better antennas where necessary.

A further detailed proposal from Comsearch proposed a new antenna category known as B2, which would lead to a reduction in antenna size of up to 50 percent in some frequency bands. This would be a significant cost saving for link operators.

At the present time, the industry is waiting for the FCC to deliberate on the responses to its 10-153 docket, including those on reducing antenna size.

See the briefing paper below for more information.

Ian Marshall
Regulatory Manager, Aviat Networks

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Professional Services Center in San Antonio, TX

Network Management Centre. BT has several mana...

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Nathan Hitchcock, NOC team lead for Aviat Networks, provides guidance for all network services professionals in the company’s network operations center during its 24×7 rotation. At the NOC, Hitchcock describes a range of customers the company services—from Internet service providers to public safety networks (government wireless) . “Our customers find value in the NOC,” he says.

“It’s a natural progression that once the network is live, that the NOC just take over the managed services aspect of it,” Hitchcock says. “We provide value to our customers by helping reduce the operational expenses that are associated with managed services.”

When Aviat Networks moved its NOC to San Antonio, Texas, many backbone infrastructure and wireless security improvements were made, according to Hitchcock. And all the technical knowledge was transferred from Raleigh, N.C. He sums up the Aviat Networks’ network services value proposition as: a multi-disciplinary team that provides managed services to meet the clients’ needs.

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