Securing the Mobile Network: Why it’s Critical for All

SSL-certificate-Aviat-Networks-Strong-Security-microwave-radio-solution-for-mobile-backhaul-includes-technology-based-on-SSL-07Nov13

Photo credit: jeff_golden / Foter.com / CC BY-SA

In an era of ubiquitous broadband communication at work and home, the issue of security in mobile backhaul is more important than ever. The new generation of LTE wireless technology is an enabler for applications such as mobile commerce, voice over IP (VoIP) and high-definition video delivery to smartphones, but it has also opened some sinkholes in the foundation that pre-LTE architectures and applications have established.

Impact of an Unsecure Mobile Network
Security incidents can have severe consequences for mobile network operators (MNOs). Short-term public relations hiccups can be dealt with, but over the long term, carriers are subject to subscriber churn, which can significantly influence profitability. Softpedia.com cited a study performed by Opinion Matters, whereby it was determined that 75 percent of smartphone users in the UK would likely change mobile providers if a security breach occurred on their current network.

In addition to subscriber churn, MNOs can face litigation and legal problems, especially when a security breach affects enterprise service. The economic impact can be several hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars. In a report presented by McAfee at the World Economic Forum, it was found that more than half of 600 IT executives surveyed have suffered large-scale incidents that have associated downtime costs of over $6.5 million per day. For more on this topic, see the complete white paper below, which discusses the burgeoning need for security in mobile backhaul in terms of benefits to mobile network operators and society.

Read More


The Impact of Streaming Video on Wireless Network Services

Video call between Sweden and Singapore, on So...

Sustained video streaming, such as a video call over a mobile network, strains the stat mux paradigm of oversubscribing Ethernet microwave backhaul. However, proper management can ensure a consistent, high-quality user experience can be maintained. Image via Wikipedia (author: Kalleboo)

Mobile backhaul networks today support Ethernet microwave transport for 3G and 4G wireless technology services alongside legacy 2G and 3G TDM-based microwave equipment. However, as late as 2009 these wireless network services were solely TDM transport. One of the primary benefits of moving to Ethernet microwave transport has been the inherent statistical multiplexing (stat mux) gains. Stat mux relies on the fact that not everyone is “talking” at the same time and when they do, their IP radio packet sizes are variable, whereas networks based on TDM have to be provisioned statically for peak rates to individual wireless microwave sites.

With the advent of Ethernet, the typical practice is to oversubscribe all the wireless network services (based on individual peak rates) knowing that there is a statistical improbability of hitting the peak rate across all your wireless communication towers at the same exact moment.

Now enter video streaming where data is “streamed” between two wireless communication points over a sustained period (e.g., 30-second YouTube video clips, Skype HD Video Conferencing, Netflix movies). The sustained aspect of these video streams begins to strain the overall stat mux paradigm. Not only does video remain sustained but also it uses large-size IP radio packets that do not vary greatly. VoIP does the same thing, but the effect is much less significant as the overall bandwidth utilization is much lower.

Oversubscription becomes more challenging the more active video streaming is at any given moment. Imagine a scenario where the latest cat-playing-a-piano video gets posted online and everyone starts viewing it at virtually the same time. For a large swath of bandwidth, stat mux will reach zero for approximately four minutes. The upside is that you can add more bandwidth and/or offer differentiated wireless network services levels that guarantee certain bandwidth or application performance. Even so, video streaming does not totally negate the benefits of an Ethernet microwave transport, it just needs to be properly understood and managed to ensure a consistent user experience across all applications and services for your global wireless solutions.

Steve Loebrich
Director of Product and Solutions Marketing
Aviat Networks

Read More


Comprehensive Embedded Security in Microwave (Wireless) Networks

The current and ongoing migration toward IP networking on backhaul networks supports rising data volumes, which is increasing the opportunities and motivations for data and call interception. As data volumes rise in wireless networks and their associated microwave backhaul, security has become of greater concern.

This white paper presents a look at security issues, and the broad portfolio of solutions for remediating such concerns for microwave operators.

Read More


Subscribe to our newsletter